Superman Saves the Day

This Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal comic made me laugh.

[I tried to embed, but you'll have to click through. It's worth it!]

And, even better, it reminded me of some actual moral psychology research that has been done! It involves trolley problems (that old chestnut), and people of "abhorrent political philosophy" - i.e. Nazis. Perhaps unsurprisingly (?), people are more willing to trade the lives of these people off against other lives, whether they are anonymous strangers, family, or friends. Read more about Superman Saves the Day

Moral of the Story: Morality and Literature: May We Be Forgiven

May We Be Forgiven by A. M. Homes

This is a book about a family that is probably more dysfunctional than your own...hopefully. It's filled with tales of infidelity, fatal car accidents, illegal arms dealers, non-traditional penal systems - and that's really just skimming the surface. But I've caught your interest right? No one can avoid looking at a train wreck. So, I encourage you to pick up this book and enjoy the disaster. Read more about Moral of the Story: Morality and Literature: May We Be Forgiven

Worth the Weight

It’s been a while since I’ve reviewed any research here, but that doesn’t mean interesting things haven’t been happening. Now there’s exciting news – fellow PhD student Elise Holland has had an article published! It’s called Worth the Weight: The Objectification of Overweight Versus Thin Targets. Read more about Worth the Weight

Ten Quick Questions With: Steve Loughnan

Ten Quick Questions With is a new part of the Melbourne Moral Psychology Lab website where I'll be helping you get to know the members of the lab and other experts in the field. Today's interview is with Stephen Loughnan, a research fellow looking at how people's views of moral standing affect who or what deserve moral concern and many other interesting areas.

Check out the full interview below and be sure to leave any extra questions or thoughts you have in the comments section.

Who are you and what do you study? Read more about Ten Quick Questions With: Steve Loughnan

Ten Quick Questions With: Hanne M Watkins

Ten Quick Questions With is a new part of the Melbourne Moral Psychology Lab website where I'll be helping you get to know the members of the lab and other experts in the field. Today's interview is with Hanne Watkins, a prolific blog poster who's working on her PhD by looking at people's views on the morality of killing and how war affects those views.

Check out the full interview below and be sure to leave any extra questions or thoughts you have in the comments section.

Who are you and what do you study? Read more about Ten Quick Questions With: Hanne M Watkins

Moral of the Story: Neanderthal Babies

Some days I go to uni with a list of things to do, they all get done, and I feel happy about it. Other days, I go to uni with a list of things to do, they all get done, yet I get to the end of the day feeling disgruntled. On one of those latter days, the main problem seemed to be that too few of the things on my to-do list had involved writing; I was in the mood for tangible outcomes, word counts and piles of paper, but nothing on my “now-done” list provided this. Read more about Moral of the Story: Neanderthal Babies

Book Review: 'Psychology in the Bathroom' by Nick Haslam

Placement of the Toilet Seat as a Moral Issue

Psychology in the Bathroom, written by the Melbourne Moral Psychology's own Nick Haslam is a book about an unspoken subject that is usually left behind the bathroom door. While it does cover toilet humour, this is a well-researched and super informative humorous book about the toilet...and flatulance, toilet graffiti, and potty-mouths. Read more about Book Review: 'Psychology in the Bathroom' by Nick Haslam

Moral of the Story: World War Z

This is the second time I am attempting to read World War Z, by Max Brooks, and I suspect I am going to have to give up this time around as well. It’s not because it’s a bad book, badly written or poorly plotted or anything like that. It’s because the stories in it – transcripts of interviews with survivors of the zombie apocalypse – terrify me. The first time I tried to read it, I tended to read a chapter or two before bed, and I invariably had nightmares about zombies. This time, I’ve been reading it in the middle of the day. So far, it seems to be working. Read more about Moral of the Story: World War Z

Moral of the Story: Mind the Meat

1. I’ve been baking. It’s kind of late, I’m a bit sleepy, but I need to wait for the muffins to cool before I can cover them in delicious cream-cheese icing and decorate them, and so – here I am. It’s Monday, which is Moral of the Story Day, but since I haven’t finished my book I’m going to share some random thoughts about meat instead. Or, not quite random. Read more about Moral of the Story: Mind the Meat

Moral of the Story: Oryx and Crake

You know that feeling, when you’re reading a book so dense with ideas, that at every second page you want to dog-ear a corner to save the thought for later? Except that you can’t, because the book is borrowed, and anyway there’s just toooo much to think about? Yeah. If you don’t know that feeling, find someone from whom you can borrow Oryx and Crake, and read it. Read more about Moral of the Story: Oryx and Crake

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